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Dogs + Treatment

  • Infertility in a male dog is defined as the inability to produce a successful pregnancy in a fertile female, even with multiple breedings near the time of ovulation. The causes of infertility fall under three broad categories: failure to copulate or ejaculate, poor semen quality, and prostatic disease. This handout explains the possible causes in detail, as well as methods to diagnose and treat them.

  • This handout discusses the anatomy of the dog’s ear canal, how to safely clean your dog’s ears to prevent ear infections, and how to apply topical ear medications if needed.

  • Osteoarthritis is a progressive, degenerative disease of the joints. Although dramatically under-recognized, OA is actually one of the most common chronic diseases of dogs. In addition to diet modifications, exercise, weight loss, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, management strategies for OA may include a disease-modifying osteoarthritis drug such as PSGAG. PSGAG is a disease modifying agent that slows cartilage destruction, promotes cartilage healing, and helps lubricate the joints. It is given as a series of injections that can be given by an owner at home. A positive response is expected at the end of the first course of treatment. Injections are typically used long-term as PSGAG is well-tolerated by most dogs.

  • Kennel cough is a broad term covering any infectious or contagious condition of dogs where coughing is one of the major clinical signs. It is also referred to as infectious tracheobronchitis. Several viruses and bacteria can cause kennel cough, often at the same time. Because the infection spreads when dogs are housed together, it is often seen soon after dogs have been in kennels, hence the name 'kennel cough'.

  • Lymphoma is a cancer of the lymph nodes and lymphatic system. This cancer may be localized to one particular region, or may spread throughout the entire body. Lymphoma is a relatively common cancer, accounting for 15-20% of new cancer diagnoses in dogs. The prognosis for lymphoma varies, depending on various characteristics that can only be determined by specialized testing.

  • Mastitis is a term used to describe inflammation of a mammary gland. In most cases, mastitis is caused by a bacterial infection. Trauma to the mammary gland, or prolonged periods of milk accumulation without milk removal, can lead to inflammation within the mammary gland. Most dogs with mastitis can be treated on an outpatient basis with oral antibiotics and pain medications, though severe cases may require hospitalization or surgery.

  • Meloxicam is given by mouth or injection and is used to treat general and surgical pain, inflammation, fever, and osteoarthritis. Side effects are uncommon but may include upset stomach, changes in urination, or yellowing of the skin. Do not use in pets that are sensitive to NSAIDs, have kidney or liver disease, are dehydrated or anorexic, or are currently taking other steroids or NSAIDs. If a negative reaction occurs, contact your veterinarian.

  • Silymarin is an over-the-counter nutritional supplement that is used off-label and is given by mouth to treat liver and cancer conditions. Give as directed. Side effects are uncommon but may include vomiting or diarrhea. Do not use it in pets that are allergic to it. If a negative reaction occurs, please call the veterinary office.

  • Distemper in Dogs

    El moquillo es una enfermedad vírica altamente contagiosa que afecta a los perros domésticos. Otras especies como hurones, mapaches y mofetas también se ven afectadas por esta enfermedad.

  • Pain research has advanced suggesting that a more appropriate choice for managing the chronic pain of OA is multi-modal therapy. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are just one of the options leveraged for multi-modal OA management. These include joint supplements, nutraceuticals, nutrition, adjunctive medicines, physical medicine, and changes to the home environment. Every multi-modal treatment plan is tailored to meet the needs of the individual patient and then adjusted as treatment progresses. Once a full multi-modal pain management plan is in place, your veterinarian may be able to lower the dose of NSAID to minimize the risk of an adverse event, and to reserve a full therapeutic dose for any acute inflammatory pain event.

Contact

2554 Mission St.
San Francisco, CA
94110

Phone: 867 5309

Hours of Operation

Monday 9 am – 9 pm
Tuesday 9 am – 9 pm
Wednesday 9 am – 9 pm
Thursday 9 am – 9 pm
Friday 9 am – 9 pm
Saturday 9 am – 5 pm
Sunday Closed