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Treatment

  • Giardiasis is an intestinal infection of man and animals cased by a microscopic protozoan parasite Giardia duodenalis. Giardia is a simple one-celled parasitic species; it is not a "worm", bacteria, or virus. Giardiasis can be an important cause of diarrhea in animals and humans. However, many cats are infected without developing clinical signs or the diarrhea is treated as 'non-specific'.

  • Certain medical conditions can be controlled by the use of drugs that are only available in an injectable format. In many cases, dog owners are willing and able to administer these medications at home. Most dogs do not seem to mind routine injections which are given in the subcutaneous tissue. This handout provides step by step instructions. Dispose of the used needles and syringes properly.

  • Giving pills to cats can be a challenge, even for the most experienced veterinarian! The easiest way to give your cat a pill is to hide the pill in food. Some cats will always find the pill and spit it out, so you may need to administer it directly into your cat's mouth. This handout provides a step-by-step guide to do this, along with some other options if it is still too difficult.

  • Giving pills to dogs can be a challenge, even for the most experienced veterinarian! The easiest way to give your dog a pill is to hide the pill in food. Some dogs will always find the pill and spit it out, so you may need to administer it directly into your dog's mouth. This handout provides a step-by-step guide to doing this at home.

  • Heartworms are blood-borne parasites that reside in the heart or adjacent large blood vessels of infected animals. There is no drug approved for treating heartworms in cats and surgical removal is generally the best option. Veterinarians now strongly recommend that all cats receive year-round monthly heartworm preventative in areas where mosquitoes are active all year round. Cats that live in colder areas, where mosquitoes are seasonal, should be given monthly preventives for at least six months of the year.

  • Heartworm disease is serious and potentially life-threatening to dogs. Treatment involves several components to combat potential bacterial infection, kill the heartworm larvae (microfilaria), kill the adult heartworms, and then test to confirm successful treatment. Complete rest for a dog undergoing treatment is essential. The prognosis for dogs after heartworm treatment is generally good if the pet owner follows all veterinary recommendations closely.

  • Hepatozoonosis in dogs is caused by ingestion of one of two organisms: H. americanum and H. canis. Both parasites are more common in the southern United States. The clinical sign and treatments for dogs with hepatozoonosis differ depending on the parasite species causing the infection. In either case, with appropriate treatment, the prognosis is generally good.

  • Canine hot spots are red, inflamed skin lesions that appear quickly, ooze, and may contain pus. They are the result of a dog excessively scratching, licking, or chewing at an itch. There are several possible underlying causes of the itch and it is crucial to determine what it is to successfully treat the problem. This handout explains these possible causes and the treatment(s) required to resolve them.

  • Your veterinarian may prescribe rectal medication if your pet is unable to swallow oral medications or if a specific required medication cannot be effectively absorbed with oral delivery. The rectal tissues contain large numbers of blood vessels very close to their surface, which means that medications delivered to this area are rapidly absorbed into the bloodstream. Rectal medication is most commonly used to treat seizures.

  • Medicated shampoos may be prescribed for a variety of skin conditions. These baths should be performed in an area that is comfortably warm, using lukewarm water. Medicated shampoo should be applied to a clean, wet coat, so start out by thoroughly rinsing your cat with lukewarm water. Shampoo should be worked into the coat thoroughly and allowed to sit for 10 minutes prior to rinsing, unless directed otherwise by your veterinarian.

Contact

2554 Mission St.
San Francisco, CA
94110

Phone: 867 5309

Hours of Operation

Monday 9 am – 9 pm
Tuesday 9 am – 9 pm
Wednesday 9 am – 9 pm
Thursday 9 am – 9 pm
Friday 9 am – 9 pm
Saturday 9 am – 5 pm
Sunday Closed