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  • In the words of Theodore Roosevelt, An Airedale can do anything any other dog can do — and then lick the other dog, if he has to.

  • Having your dog accompany you during travel may add enjoyment to your trip. It is important to keep your dog's safety in mind when traveling, so be sure to check with the airline well in advance of your trip. For pets that are too large to travel in the cabin, you have two options: checked luggage or manifest cargo. Take direct flights whenever possible and try to avoid connections and layovers. Have your dog examined by your veterinarian in advance of the trip. Flight requirements may include written proof of certain vaccinations, blood tests, or anti-parasitic treatment that has been performed within a specified time period. Your dog's travel carrier will be its home for much of your trip, so it is important to choose the right carrier. By applying a few common sense rules, you can keep your traveling dog safe and sound.

  • These large working dogs were originally bred to hunt ferocious prey animals such as bears and boars, and to defend their master's property. They are docile most of the time, good-natured, with courage, alertness and dignity. They are extremely loyal companions. However, Akitas are also stubborn, self-willed, and aloof when first introduced to strangers.

  • The Alaskan Malamute is the largest of all sled dogs, and has a somewhat wolf-like appearance. Friendly and outgoing with a distinct independent streak, the Malamute is a great companion and, like most working breeds, thrives when given a job to do.

  • One of the most common medical conditions affecting cats is allergy. Flea allergy, food allergies, atopy, and contact allergies are examples of allergies in cats, with flea allergy being the most common cause. Flea allergy is a response to proteins or antigens present in the flea's saliva, and just one fleabite may cause such intense itching that the cat may severely scratch or chew itself, leading to the removal of large amounts of hair. Food allergy testing is conducted by feeding an elimination or hypoallergenic diet. If your cat's symptoms improve after the food trial, a presumptive diagnosis of food allergy is made.

  • An allergy is a state of over-reactivity or hypersensitivity of the immune system to a particular substance called an allergen. Most allergens are proteins from plants, insects, animals, or foods. In the dog, the most common symptom associated with allergies is itching of the skin, either localized (in one area) or generalized (all over the body). The symptoms of allergies can be confused with other disorders, or occur concurrently with them. Therefore, do not attempt to diagnose your dog without veterinary professional assistance.

  • Allopurinol is an oral medication typically used to prevent uric acid and calcium oxalate stones in dogs. It is also used off-label to treat leishmaniasis and gout in dogs and other species. Side effects are uncommon but may involve stomach upset. Caution must be taken when allopurinol is used in conjunction with certain other medications. It should not be used in pets with liver or kidney dysfunction or in red-tailed hawks.

  • Our knowledge of bird nutrition is constantly evolving. This is due both to heightened awareness of the importance of nutrition and to increased research into birds different needs. As with all other animals, birds need a proper balance of carbohydrates, proteins, fat, vitamins, minerals and water. Different species of birds often require different foods.

  • The colorful Amazon parrot (Amazona sp.) is one of the most common of all the pet parrots kept in captivity. They originate from Mexico, Central America, South America, and the adjacent islands of the West Indies.

  • Descendants of English Foxhounds brought to the US in the 17th century by George Washington and several of his contemporaries, American English Coonhounds were bred to handle North America's rougher terrain. A dual-purpose dog, they were employed to hunt fox during the day and raccoons at night, using their endless energy and enthusiastic bawl.

Contact

2554 Mission St.
San Francisco, CA
94110

Phone: 867 5309

Hours of Operation

Monday 9 am – 9 pm
Tuesday 9 am – 9 pm
Wednesday 9 am – 9 pm
Thursday 9 am – 9 pm
Friday 9 am – 9 pm
Saturday 9 am – 5 pm
Sunday Closed